fatigue

Presenting ovarian cancer & physical activity research at the ESSA conference, Adelaide

Every two years sees the national Exercise & Sports Science Australia (ESSA) conference held, which brings together about a thousand researchers, clinicians, academics and some amazing presenters to discuss the latest in physical activity research, clinical guidelines and the opportunity to collaborate and bring forward great ideas to move the field forward and create the best possible outcomes for our patients.

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The highlights of this conference for me were:

* Prof Daniel Green – why exercise is better for the cardiovascular system than we first believed

* Prof Graham Kerr – Exercise in patients with neurodegenerative disorders

* Dr Kim Bennell – exercise as therapy for osteoarthritis

* A/Prof Lorimer Moseley – Exercise for the patient with chronic pain

These talks were inspirational and I managed to learn some great information. However, this conference was also more special for me as I was fortunate enough to present my research on exercise for women with advanced ovarian cancer.

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It was a great environment to discuss my findings, in which these patients who were undergoing chemotherapy who exercised for more than 90 minutes/week had reduced fatigue, slept better, improved quality of life, were stronger and had less anxiety.

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I also had a poster viewing session, which was a great way to interact with other researchers. Here I met an expert in chronic pain, Matthew Jones, and he was able to give me insight into how he helps to reduce pain by exercising in young healthy people, something of massive interest we seek to investigate in the future for cancer survivors.

I also managed to attend some great presentations of colleagues and experts in the field:

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Dr Fiona Naumann (above) spoke on the complex considerations for exercise physiologists working with cancer survivors, Carolina Sandler gave great insight to the Post-Cancer Fatigue experienced by survivors, and how exercise therapy can help manage this, whilst Simon Rosenbaum discussed his research improving the mental health issues for patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

In terms of cancer & exercise research, there was also other great talks on reducing side-effects of Prostate cancer treatment by Brad Wall and Tina Skinner, and a pre-surgery exercise program by Andrew Murnane. Anna Meares OAM, olympic medalist for cycling also presented her amazing story of recovering from a fractured neck vertibrae only to return and win a silver medal at the London games.

 

Overall, it was a fantastic few days – and to top it off, I was very surprised and honoured to be awarded a research award for my work.

 

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Check out the Twitter feed for the ESSA conference #ESSA14 

 

Now, I return to Sydney with a whole range of new ideas, more potential researchers to do further work with as I set the bar high with what we can achieve and assist as many future survivors as we can.

 

Please add me on twitter, ask questions, share our quest with other survivors, follow and most of all, just get out there and get active! We are here to help!

Your exercise physiologist,

David

Twitter – @Davemiz_EP

E-mail – d.mizrahi@unsw.edu.au

exerciseoncologyaustralia.wordpress.com

 

Yoga reduces fatigue and improves vitality for breast cancer – time to get stretching

It has been a few crazy weeks since i’ve posted after spending many late nights trying to finish my thesis, as well as putting together presentations for conferences around Australia coming up, but I have found time as I really wanted to promote an article I read in the Journal of Clinical Oncology that was published this year titled:

Yoga’s Impact on Inflammation, Mood, and Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Trial by Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser

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Now, I personally do not engage regularly in yoga – I have on occasion and really enjoyed it, and really do promote it to women, people with back issues or core-stability weakness and those who like a group environment. Not only is it relaxing, there are emerging benefits coming from scientific research which is great.

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This study made women partake in Hatha yoga for 2x 90 minute sessions per week for 12 weeks. This is a fair amount to partake in, and a realistic place to start an exercise program.

Here were the benefits: Reduced fatigue, increased vitality as well as a range of blood-markers associated with fatigue and inflammation (IL6, TNFa).

Thats pretty impressive!

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By partaking in regular yoga, you can allow yourself to feel better, have more energy, get out there in the world, live life again, take control, be who you want to be!

If you are considering getting back to your old yoga classes or starting a new one, dont try and rush to complete the most complex stretches straight away. Ease into things at a basic level for the first couple of weeks. Once your body is comfortable, then you can start to challenge yourself.

You can do it! One stretch at a time!

Below is a link to the article:

http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2014/01/21/JCO.2013.51.8860.short